Sunday, August 26, 2012

Solo Travel in Tanzania - Moshi






The road to Moshi from Dar es Salaam was narrow and bumpy and when we weren't passing cars we were in the middle of the road to avoid all the potholes. We were inches from passing trucks and the bus rocked from the proximity.

Moshi, at the foot of Kilimanjaro, was an interesting town and I stayed at the Honeybadger Lodge. I wouldn't recommend it if you're looking for a comfortable place to stay. It's out of Moshi town at the end of a long, dirt road. The walkways are not well-lit at night and my room was wretched with no hot water and black gunk coming out the taps. I wasn't the only one disappointed, although it sounds like all I do is complain! I finally moved into town when their guard dog chose my window to howl under during the night. What's ironic is I put a review of the place in TripAdvisor and their reply suggested I was lying. They never offered me another room and they certainly never went out looking for the noise in the night, nor apologized in the morning. Nevermind, I really liked Joseph and thought he was a genuinely nice guy. He seemed a bit flustered. But what stood out was the suggestion that I'm a cheapskate because I wanted the 'cheapest' room. Good luck to them!

I met some WONDERFUL people in Moshi, especially Felician, the President of the Albino Association, and everyone I was in contact with, from the staff at the hotel I got in town to the travel agents, were helpful and friendly. Tanzanians are fabulous people.








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The owner of the wonderful Coffee Shop restaurant. The food was fantastic, a must if you're in Moshi!



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My dear friend Felician. He had five children and lived on next to nothing. The government gives no aid to the disabled and there are no social programs nor resources available. Most people I talked to were not happy with the government and were disgusted with government corruption. A line I heard often was: 'If I worked in the government, I'd have lots of money.'